Archive for April, 2010

April 30, 2010

Final Poem of the Day

by thiszine

We close National Poetry Month with a final poem of the day, “Bee Prophecy” by Jay Udall.

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April 29, 2010

Poem of the Day

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Enjoy the poem “10th Street Anthem” by Santee Frazier.

April 28, 2010

The End of Poetry

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BY LACEY N. DUNHAM

With only two days left in National Poetry Month, it seems like the end of poetry until next year’s month-long celebration of the craft. After all, who reads poetry anyway? Dozens of writers and avid readers I know (including myself) neglect poetry 11 months of the year.

My new goal (added to a long list of rotating goals on a mental “to-do list”) is to read one poem each week. I realize I don’t treasure poetry and the folks who write it often enough unless it’s during the month of April. If Poetry were my child, she would weep in her tiny boarding school room about how her mother doesn’t love her, followed by years of expansive therapy in Manhattan.

Well, I’m not going to pay for her therapy, so I’m excusing myself as the cause (or, at least, a cause). Reading one poem a week doesn’t take much time and it may even cure a variety of ailments: brain death from watching too much TV; writer’s block; dust collecting on poetry collections in libraries and bookstores (or on my own bookshelves for that matter); dust-related allergies; guilt for not embracing poetry enough; general malaise; boredom; athlete’s foot (thought this last one is still unconfirmed by the FDA). Unlike commercial drugs, the side effects are few. So, beginning May 1, it’s 1 poem 1 week. I’ll let you know how it goes.

April 28, 2010

Poem of the Day

by thiszine

Read Dorothea Grossman’s six line poem “I have to tell you” for today’s daily dose of poetry.

April 27, 2010

Seeking Contributing Bloggers

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this is seeking contributing bloggers to join our literary endeavor.

As a contributing blogger you would:
-Submit three unique posts a month.
-Post under a byline tagging you as the author.
-Receive a bio on our blog and website.
-Support a growing online literary magazine for new and emerging writers and artists.
-Rejoice with eternal accolades in the form of awesomeness and kittens.

We encourage bloggers to be creative with their posts. Funny, serious, opinionated, loves/hates, lists… it’s up to you! We have three guidelines: you must be the original author of the post; the post must be previously unpublished elsewhere, and posts must relate to the literary world in some way. Our last guideline is broadly defined and doesn’t have to specifically reflect books, authors, etc.


For consideration send an e-mail to thiszine@gmail.com containing:

-Three ideas for posts you would write
-Your name and e-mail contact
-Links to your blog or previous blogging, as applicable OR a fully written blog post example if you do not have any links to share
-A brief (3-5 sentences) statement on why you want to blog for this .

Please share widely! We’re excited to bring new voices to our blog!

April 27, 2010

Poem of the Day

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Today’s poem of the day is by Alexander Long:

Until you taste what failure is, you will
Never sing that pain style requires.

One dark morning earlier in this life,
I felt two hooded men approaching me

In an alley. One, or both, roundhoused me
From behind.

Continue reading “Style in Slow Motion” at AGNI Online.

April 26, 2010

Book review: Matterhorn by Karl Marlantes

by thiszine

Video book review courtesy of Maria’s Bookshop in Durango, CO.

Would you like to review books (or music or film) for us? this is looking for great reviewers to join our list of contributors! For more information on becoming a reviewer, visit our website and click on “submissions” for more details.

April 26, 2010

Poem of the Day

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Today’s poem of the day is: Penelope Says, translated by Karen Van Dyck

April 25, 2010

Would you let your child read this?

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by Lacey N. Dunham

Recently, the American Library Association (ALA) released its list of the Top Ten Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2009. I don’t know what school principals, teachers, parent associations, churches, individuals, libraries, politicians, or whoever else are challenging these books but it seems that they have a problem with issues and themes that are ripe for the age groups these books target: sex, sexuality, and rebellion through language (’cause who didn’t relish the first time they said “fuck” to their parents?).

However, Eleanor Barkhorn, in a blog post at The Atlantic, complained that the ALA list was “dismaying.” Much of her complaint stems from how the ALA compiled its list (which represents approximately 25% of challenges nationwide, a dismal number even discounting that challenges are underreported.

In her post, Barkhorn writes that “when parents complain about what their children read, it shows that books are doing their jobs: affecting young readers so much that they are transformed. It’s scary to think of books being removed from libraries because they’re controversial. But it’s even scarier to think of a country where books are so irrelevant, parents don’t even care enough to complain.”

Are books still a force of controversy today or is the trend of fewer complaints a reflection that issues like sex, homosexuality, drug use, and racism have moved into the public discourse and are no longer consider taboo discussion topics except in a few, select areas of the country? Maybe the fewer books that are challenged is a hopeful sign that in our ever diverse, ever multicultural society, things that shocked my grandmother fail to raise the eyebrows of her children and grandchildren. Book apathy might not be the blame for the ALA’s results. Mainstreaming taboos into the status-quo could be a much larger, and far more welcome, culprit.

————————————–

The ALA’s Top Ten Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2009

1. ttyl, ttfn, l8r, g8r (series), by Lauren Myracle
Reasons: Nudity, Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group, Drugs

2. And Tango Makes Three by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson
Reasons: Homosexuality

3. The Perks of Being A Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Reasons: Homosexuality, Sexually Explicit, Anti-Family, Offensive Language, Religious Viewpoint, Unsuited to Age Group, Drugs, Suicide

4. To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Reasons: Racism, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

5. Twilight (series) by Stephenie Meyer
Reasons: Sexually Explicit, Religious Viewpoint, Unsuited to Age Group

6. Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
Reasons: Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

7. My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
Reasons: Sexism, Homosexuality, Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Religious Viewpoint, Unsuited to Age Group, Drugs, Suicide, Violence

8. The Earth, My Butt, and Other Big, Round Things by Carolyn Mackler
Reasons: Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

9. The Color Purple Alice Walker
Reasons: Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

10. The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier
Reasons: Nudity, Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

EXTRAS:
–For more on how the ALA develops its annual list, read their website.

Review of #2 on the ALA’s 2009 list, And Tango Makes Three , by this editor Lacey N. Dunham, originally written for The Feminist Review.

April 25, 2010

Poem of the Day

by thiszine

Today’s poetry by Matthew Zapruder appears in the most recent issue of Tin House: “This Little Game.”

April 24, 2010

Poem of the Day

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Today’s poetry is by Kinzee Ellis
and is brought to you by The Poets Weave on WFIU Public Radio.

April 23, 2010

Video Poem of the Day

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Alimentum, the literature of food, presents Menupoems for National Poetry Months. Each poem is about food and each is read at a cafe, restaurant, bistro, or coffee shop.

Alimentum welcomes contributions by readers for their Menupoems. Visit the Menupoems section of their website or upload a video of you reading one of the thirteen poems to Alimentum’s YouTube channel.

The poem below is read by Peter Selgin at Sky Blue Café, 700 Fatherland Street, Nashville, Tennessee. The poem is “Soufflé” by Ariana-Sophia Kartsonis.

April 22, 2010

Write Away #33

by thiszine

baseball
lightening
expanse

April 22, 2010

Video Poem of the Day

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Jim Clark creates poetry animations of famous (and deceased) poets reading their work. These virtual movies include poets as far ranging as William Shakespeare, Emily Dickinson, Dylan Thomas, and Walt Whitman. To see the awesomeness for yourself, visit Jim Clark’s YouTube page.

For a treat today, we present you with treat: John Keats reading “Bright Star.”

All rights are reserved on this video recording copyright Jim Clark 2009

April 21, 2010

Moving Beyond Words: Poetry Thoughts

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Nancy Pearl has a lovely piece for NPR on the importance of character and voice in poetry, accompanied by poetry recommendations for National Poetry Month.

April 20, 2010

Indies Choice Award

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The winners of 2010 Indies Choice Book of the Year winners, sponsored by
the American Booksellers Association, are:

Adult Fiction: Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese
Adult Nonfiction: The Lost City of Z by David Grann
Adult Debut: The Help by Kathryn Stockett
Young Adult: Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins
Middle Reader: When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead
New Picture Book: The Lion and the Mouse by Jerry Pinkney

The winners represent selections based on votes by independent booksellers nationwide.

April 16, 2010

Poems of the Day

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Today we give you three poems by Elizabeth Wilcox and published at La Petite Zine, a great online literary magazine founded in 1999, which currently publishes fierce poetry and petite prose pieces of 1000 words or less.

April 15, 2010

Write Away #32

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April 15, 2010

Poem of the Day

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Today’s collection of poems on vampires would make Stephanie Meyer proud.

Read Vampire Poems at Poets.org.

April 14, 2010

Poems of the Day

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Two poems on spring:

Spring and All by William Carlos Williams

Spring is like perhaps a hand by e.e. cummings

April 12, 2010

Poem of the Day

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Today’s poem: Shooting Rats at the Bibb County Dump by David Bottoms.

April 11, 2010

Poem of the Day

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From a recently published issue of Buzzard Picnic, Hesitation Waltz by Ivan Young.

April 10, 2010

Poem of the Day

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The treasured poem One Art by Elizabeth Bishop.

April 10, 2010

Eat, Pray, Watch the Movie

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Coming soon, Eat, Pray, Love (the movie) based on the blockbuster memoir by Elizabeth Gilbert.

April 9, 2010

Poem of the Day

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Introduction to Poetry by Billy Collins. We post this poem is in honor of the folks out there who have taken an intro creative writing or poetry writing course.